How do I determine who will be my child's guardian?

July 11th, 2019 by Erin Cram

There are often challenges when someone dies without a Will, but it can be particularly problematic if the person who has died is a parent and guardian of a minor child.

Drafting a Will - Do's and Don'ts

July 4th, 2019 by Rebecca Tenna

Writing a will is an essential step to planning the future of your assets, as well as ensuring your family and loved ones will always be taken care of. Wills allow you to maintain control of what…

Estate Grants: Grant of Probate

June 26th, 2019 by Rebecca Tenna

Probate is a process through which the court validates the authenticity of a will. Once the process is complete, the court issues a Grant of Probate. A Grant of Probate allows institutions to verify…

Power of Attorney: definitions and guidelines

June 17th, 2019 by Rebecca Tenna

A Power of Attorney is a document that allows you to appoint a person or organization to manage your financial affairs and some legal matters in the occasion that you become unable to do so. A Power…

Dad cut me out of the will — what are my options?

January 25th, 2019 by FH&P Lawyers

Dealing with the passing of a family member, especially a parent, is a painful and emotional process. What can make this process even more difficult is finding out that you were not included in their…

Wills for Westbank First Nations People Living on Reserve Land

May 14th, 2018 by FH&P Lawyers

Are you curious about the laws surrounding wills for Westbank First Nations people living on reserve land?

Is my foreign Will valid in BC?

March 28th, 2018 by FH&P Lawyers

In order to avoid frustration creating an Estate Plan in British Columbia, Canada, have your Will checked by a Wills lawyer to ensure it complies with Canadian formal requirements and de facto…

What are Life Estates

February 28th, 2018 by Nancy Ling

In these days of readily available information, there are many things that a person can figure out for themselves. However, much like auto repair and DIY home repairs, there is the potential to create…

How to Deal with Difficult Beneficiaries as an Estate Executor

January 8th, 2018 by Nancy Ling

Are you the executor of an estate who is struggling due to a poor relationship with the estate beneficiaries? Acting as the executor of an estate can be a difficult job. Unfortunately, it can be made…

Estate Planning for Germans Living in BC

November 24th, 2017 by FH&P Lawyers

When it comes to Estate Planning, having certainty that your last wishes are executed is central.

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How do I determine who will be my child's guardian?

There are often challenges when someone dies without a Will, but it can be particularly problematic if the person who has died is a parent and guardian of a minor child.

Drafting a Will - Do's and Don'ts

Writing a will is an essential step to planning the future of your assets, as well as ensuring your family and loved ones will always be taken care of. Wills allow you to maintain control of what happens to your life’s earnings. This could mean assets with monetary value, such as real estate, bank accounts, and businesses, but it could also mean things of sentimental value, such as family heirlooms and pets. Wills allow you the agency to appoint who you believe is the best fit to take care of your belongings after you pass. This gives clarity and ease of administration to your loved ones. When you make a will, you ensure that you decide what happens to your assets, as opposed to the government. It gives you the peace of mind of maximizing the number of belongings you have going to beneficiaries. When writing a will, one must take concise action and take numerous things into consideration. As such, we at FH&P have compiled a list of a few Do’s and Don’ts to help with the process:

Estate Grants: Grant of Probate

Probate is a process through which the court validates the authenticity of a will. Once the process is complete, the court issues a Grant of Probate. A Grant of Probate allows institutions to verify they are dealing with the right executor and the will presented is the correct will. Not all wills need to be probated