Mediation Part 2: Jill Dougans

April 30th, 2019 by Rebecca Tenna

Jill Dougans has been working as a mediator since 2003, and is a member in good standing with the Roster Society now called MediateBC. In addition to being a trial lawyer since 1987 Jill obtained a…

Business Practices and Consumer Protection Act: Direct Sales, Distance Sales and Prepaid Purchase Cards

February 5th, 2019 by FH&P Lawyers

It’s a classic scenario — someone rings your doorbell or calls your home to ‘make you an offer you can’t refuse’ on a product or service that they are selling. Whether it’s a robust cable package, a…

Constructive Dismissal Revisited

February 21st, 2017 by FH&P Lawyers

While employers have a general right to manage the workplace, they do not have a general right to unilaterally alter important terms in the employment contract. A constructive dismissal arises where…

Employment Agreement Pitfalls

February 14th, 2017 by FH&P Lawyers

Written employment agreements can benefit both employers and employees. They provide clarity about each party’s entitlements and obligations. Perhaps because of this, written employment agreements…

(AUDIO) Gillian Dougans Discusses Civil Jury Trials in British Columbia

September 20th, 2016 by Gillian Dougans

Gillian Dougans discusses civil jury trials in British Columbia with AM1150.

(AUDIO) Paul Johnson Discusses Civil & Commercial Debt Collection Actions

September 6th, 2016 by FH&P Lawyers

Paul Johnson discusses civil & commercial debt collection actions with AM1150.

Cycling on the Streets of Kelowna

June 16th, 2016 by Gillian Dougans

Can cars and bikes share the road? Yes! But it requires an effort on both parts.

Social Media and your Personal Injury Claim

December 17th, 2015 by FH&P Lawyers

In a world interwoven with social media, insurance companies are increasingly using social media accounts to decrease the value of a personal injury claim. Being aware of how insurance companies will…

Waivers in Sport, Recreation, and Adventure Tourism

November 4th, 2015 by Clay Williams

It is an annual tradition for my family to go to the mall in the fall and purchase our annual season ski passes. We get our pictures taken (and I have kept our passes for every year – they show the…

Used Vehicles and the Sale of Goods Act

December 17th, 2014 by FH&P Lawyers

I recently had the opportunity to defend a car dealership in an action where the plaintiff was claiming that they had effectively sold him a lemon because components of the heating and air…

Blog Search

How do I determine who will be my child's guardian?

There are often challenges when someone dies without a Will, but it can be particularly problematic if the person who has died is a parent and guardian of a minor child.

Drafting a Will - Do's and Don'ts

Writing a will is an essential step to planning the future of your assets, as well as ensuring your family and loved ones will always be taken care of. Wills allow you to maintain control of what happens to your life’s earnings. This could mean assets with monetary value, such as real estate, bank accounts, and businesses, but it could also mean things of sentimental value, such as family heirlooms and pets. Wills allow you the agency to appoint who you believe is the best fit to take care of your belongings after you pass. This gives clarity and ease of administration to your loved ones. When you make a will, you ensure that you decide what happens to your assets, as opposed to the government. It gives you the peace of mind of maximizing the number of belongings you have going to beneficiaries. When writing a will, one must take concise action and take numerous things into consideration. As such, we at FH&P have compiled a list of a few Do’s and Don’ts to help with the process:

Estate Grants: Grant of Probate

Probate is a process through which the court validates the authenticity of a will. Once the process is complete, the court issues a Grant of Probate. A Grant of Probate allows institutions to verify they are dealing with the right executor and the will presented is the correct will. Not all wills need to be probated